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Ruth Richardson
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 8:15 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Interesting piece of advice on TV last night for when you have a reactive dog. Rather than getting them to face their fears, you simply say, "Lets go!" and change direction when approaching something they are scared of. This builds up their confidence in you and so in time means they get less scared and react less. I thought it made sense and would have helped Hugo! You learn something new every day! I will use this with Fin if he develops any fears as he matures.
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Amanda Elsdon-Dew
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 11:54 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Many thanks. That ties in with what Brenda showed me, and also my 'happiness' classes with the Dog Communication girls. Their lessons were all about watching when your dog began to tense up and instantly turning away. So much better than shouting at the dog isn't it? Hopefully, though, your Fin will remain the calm confident chap that he is to date. Well done! Amanda
Another thing that worked well yesterday was successful distraction when a train clattered close by. In the past Dinah would try to chase it. Now I keep her on a long lead nearby, and if possible like yesterday get her so engrossed in a game that she doesn't notice. Worked well yesterday.

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Ruth Richardson
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 2:07 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Yes I use distraction all the time, often just to stop Fin running off to have a nose at passers-by! I have to use it at his class, as he will bark at other dogs running up the hall when doing recalls if I don't!
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maxnick
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:28 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

That is interesting, thanks. Smile

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Brenda Wilkinson
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 6:55 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Yes good advice always give a reactive dog the space and time they require.

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Ruth Richardson
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 7:47 am Reply with quoteBack to top

I wish I had done this with Hugo when his fears first developed. His signs of tension were so obvious when he dropped his shoulders and stalked!
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Brenda Wilkinson
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:14 am Reply with quoteBack to top

We learn as we gain more experience and with hind sight. Over the years I have had two seperate difficult dogs of my own and helped many others who have taught me lots about handling situations and how to achieve my aims with kindness and empathy with a fearful dog. Every dog I see teaches me something new we never stop learning and some dogs take longer to get results than others but perseverance and patience do pay off in the end. Ruth I know you learnt so much with Hugo and that has helped you train Fin keeping him a balanced boy.

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Valerie Fisher
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:17 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I would just like to share tip/device I have recently found to help anxious dogs who get upset by noises outside such as postmen/leaflet droppers. It is a 'paws pocket' You fill it with treats and it folds up like a soft ball. I will ignore a casual bark as Finley will often settle without intervention. I keep two ball ready filled (I have 2 dogs) and if Finley starts to get anxious I throw the balls in opposite directions so there is no food conflict between him and Sophie, by the time they have got the ball and consumed the treats they come to me with happy faces asking for more food and the scary thing is forgotten! A similar concept to the stuffed Kong but I find this works well for my 2. Here is a link:

http://www.touchangok9.co.uk/brands/Paws-Pocket.html
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Ruth Richardson
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:48 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

What a fab idea! I'm going to take one on walks for when I suspect Fin is about to run off to have a nose at other dogs/passers-by. What size do I need - small or medium?
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Brenda Wilkinson
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 3:32 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Great idea Val glad you've found something to work for your boy Smile

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Valerie Fisher
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 7:55 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I got the medium which works for us. The Small is about the size of a tennis ball. Even though my 2 are very food oriented I had to show them the food before they got really interested, but one they grasped there was food inside there was no stopping them!
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Ruth Richardson
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 9:00 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Thank you! I'll get mine ordered.
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maxnick
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:44 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Wow, what a great idea Very Happy Might get one for my dogs too.

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Amanda Elsdon-Dew
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 7:07 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Just filling in time when I should be cooking supper and saw this old thread and thought I'd add another bit to it. Just throwing titbits on the ground is proving very effective with Dinah. That is the main tip of the Dog Comm girls - treats and more treats, really a ridiculous amount, which they say actually reboots a dog's brain - and throwing treats on the ground stops the dog from looking around and keeps him/her busy. I was sooo pleased with Dinah tonight because our garden is surrounded on three sides by very barky (yappy, if I am honest) dogs and although Dinah is pretty good at ignoring them sometimes she just can't resist a ferocious charge at the fence of a particular Jack Russell (actually a sweet dog but one who most foolishly has taken to charging right up to the fence at full bark). We have double fenced but they still sometimes manage a face to face confrontation. this evening Dinah got through to face up to the JR, I went over and tried to grab her (failed) but then - rather to my amazement - she just turned round and came back to me, sat and awaited a treat. Later this evening, JR charged the fence, Dinah headed that way. Emboldened, I just said quite a quiet, 'Dinah, leave' and - again to my amazement, to be honest - she whizzed back to me, so I threw a few treats on the ground, and she bounced happily after them and then trotted back towards the house with me, despite JR still barking behind.
The biggest problem now is to keep an eye on her waistline because the treats have to be worthwhile, so I alternate pretty tiny and boring ones with exciting bits of sausage or left-over chicken or lamb, and try to reduce the amount in her food bowl accordingly, though I h ave to admit that - not unlike myself - I think she could trim a bit! Amanda

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