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Fuzydog
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 8:56 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Are there any members working their dogs??
I notice there are no recent entries to this page. I would love hear from any one involved in obedience or working trials ect.
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Ruth Richardson
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 9:02 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Not me. Hugo does go to an obedience class, but it's just basic stuff in a hall, no competitions. Would love to hear about your experiences if you take your dog, though. I think a lot of briard owners now go on Facebook to share things, so maybe you'd find more info there. I'm too much of a technophobe to tell you how to join that group, though!
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Fuzydog
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 7:09 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Aww thanks Ruth I will try to find them on facebook .
I love training my dogs they get so much out of it. My Beardie is flat out now after spending the day training for working trials today.
I am hoping that Briards or at least some uk breeders have kept the strong working instincts and if so I want one Very Happy
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Ruth Richardson
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 9:39 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I bet most of our briards have those instincts given the right handler. Good luck!
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Debs
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 4:02 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I do agility with all my four.....we do ok. The dogs all love it, even my old boy Dexter who is 12 1/2 but he only does low jumps now.
I also teach obedience but only for fun really. I tend to use my Briards as examples of how to do things in the classes. They just love showing off.

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Debs, Della, Dibley, Demi and Desmond (not forgetting my special girl Darcy and Dexter the most chilled boy ever who will be in my heart forever)
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Brenda Wilkinson
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2014 8:07 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Hi Fuzydog welcome.
If you want to compete with a Briard at obedience it would be worth you contacting Diane Goodall you can find her details on the British Briard Club site she organises the obedience competions for the British Briard club and she also competes at a good level with her own Briards. Also there is a lady who competes at Flyball with her boy also at a good level.
Hope this helps
Brenda

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Fuzydog
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2014 9:49 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Thank you Ruth and Brenda I will definitely try to contact Diane Very Happy
Debs that is fantastic working your Dexter at 12 1/2. Cool
Debs do you work dogs or bitches or both? Someone suggested that males can be antisocial with other males, I have only ever worked dogs and wonder if this is just due to poor socialisation rather than breed type, would you agree?
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Debs
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 21, 2014 1:32 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I've worked both male and female Briards at agility. Makes no odds what you use.
Generally problems are down to lack of socialisation.
Oooo, I forgot, I've also done Heelwork to Music for a laugh. No competitions around my area though, so just for fun.

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Fuzydog
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 21, 2014 7:07 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Thanks Debs, great to hear they enjoy a range of different sports. I don't think I will be trying the heelwork to music, but admire many who do. I have no musical timing Embarassed
What type of training methods do you find work best? I have been informed they can decide that today is not a work day Shocked Very Happy
Are they self motivated or do you need to work hard to get them to repeat an exercises more than once?
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Amanda Elsdon-Dew
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 12:39 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Hi. I've done lots of obedience classes with mine, not to competition standard, just for dog handling and fun. One of mine took his time to get new exercises but once he had would do them utterly faithfully and repetitively. The other two got things instantly - particularly loving the send away, finishing with a flourish and retrieving, and also scent work - but defo didn't like too much repetition and Dinah, current one, gets v frustrated if asked to do something she doesn't understand. Everyone tells me though that there are big differences between Briards.
I would love to have done more agility with Dinah than I did but I just wasn't skilful or agile enough myself and she was far too quick for me. We did classes run by Colin Skeaping (can be found on the Friendly Beardie site) and I'm sure he could fill you in on how much better Di could have been with an experienced handler. He said that she had all the right ingredients for a really good agility dog.
I'm now going to learn to track with her, starting on Friday.
Good luck!
Amanda

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Fuzydog
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 7:09 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Thank you for your reply Amanda, and very good luck with tracking training Cool I am sure you and Dinah will enjoy it.
Please let me know how it goes.
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Debs
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2014 6:21 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Clicker training works brilliantly.
Never had a dog that clicker training hasn't worked on.......is usually the owners who are the problem! !

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Fuzydog
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2014 8:38 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Yes I agree clicker training is good, I use a clicker word rather than a clicker. It is always us humans that get it wrong, usually with bad timing Embarassed
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Amanda Elsdon-Dew
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2014 10:19 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Well you super stars, it is not just getting the timing right it is getting the key instruction right too. I have spent time recently teaching Dinah to 'die' - lie out flat on her side in a most lifelike death, apart from the twitching end of her tail - by saying 'bang' and raising my arm. Now I thought I'd re-practise old obedience drills, the sit, lie, sit, stand routine and the dear dog quite misunderstood me. I raised my arm for an 'up sit' and she hurled herself onto her side, stone dead! Now I've got to rethink instructions quite a bit because Dinah definitely follows visual cues far more than verbal.
I've never been too good with the clicker, get it all tangled up with my treats, and prefer the 'gooood' approach. Amanda

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Ruth Richardson
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2014 1:49 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I'm better with a "Goood!" rather than a clicker, too, Amanda, and Hugo is also good with visual clues. He, too, gets frustrated when he doesn't know what I want and barks at me in a silly, high-pitched, indignant manner, then sticks his head through my legs!
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Zizou
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2014 2:00 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Mine respond to clickers; kissy sounds; good...all kinds. Whatever they connect with food or praise they like. I used to forget my clicker when out, so had to use other methods. Memory like a sieve. Visual clues work a treat too. I agree with that. It's how I taught Hollie French. lol Very Happy
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David T
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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 10:37 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

We have spent a lot of time and effort with training classes for Louis to try and stop his pulling on the lead - both classes with other dogs and one- on- one classes. In class, once he has "met" the other digs, he performs excellently. Responds to treats, has brilliant heel work both on and off lead and basically is best in class. But when we go on public roads, all bets are off and his training is out the window. Treats are ignored, as are stern commands so walks become a chore. We have been trying lots of things whilst on holiday in France but with little success.

Tonight, I took him out for a walk on his own. There were no distractions like dogs or cats which overrun our village and Louis seemed more at ease. With no treats, I tried a few "training" moves and he was perfect. Walking to heel, changing direction on a sixpence, stopping and sitting immediately on the command " stop ". And praising him with "good boy" did not have the usual effect of immediately pulling. In fact, the dogmatic collar could have been removed without changing his performance.

And earlier today, we took Norbert and Louis to Toulouse and took photographs of them outside the Toulouse rugby ground. Lots of people around but Louis sat still on command, with no lead, and did not move until "released". We thought Norbert was good at this but Louis is even better.

Now, since we seem to have a dog who can do everything ( apart from the "bang" trick ), how can we extend it to when other dogs or animals are around in the street? He is used to being with other dogs ( his groomer rescues dogs so there are always 10 or 12 dogs around when he goes to stay) so not sure what the problem is.

Any ideas welcome!
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David T
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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 10:38 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

We have spent a lot of time and effort with training classes for Louis to try and stop his pulling on the lead - both classes with other dogs and one- on- one classes. In class, once he has "met" the other digs, he performs excellently. Responds to treats, has brilliant heel work both on and off lead and basically is best in class. But when we go on public roads, all bets are off and his training is out the window. Treats are ignored, as are stern commands so walks become a chore. We have been trying lots of things whilst on holiday in France but with little success.

Tonight, I took him out for a walk on his own. There were no distractions like dogs or cats which overrun our village and Louis seemed more at ease. With no treats, I tried a few "training" moves and he was perfect. Walking to heel, changing direction on a sixpence, stopping and sitting immediately on the command " stop ". And praising him with "good boy" did not have the usual effect of immediately pulling. In fact, the dogmatic collar could have been removed without changing his performance.

And earlier today, we took Norbert and Louis to Toulouse and took photographs of them outside the Toulouse rugby ground. Lots of people around but Louis sat still on command, with no lead, and did not move until "released". We thought Norbert was good at this but Louis is even better.

Now, since we seem to have a dog who can do everything ( apart from the "bang" trick ), how can we extend it to when other dogs or animals are around in the street? He is used to being with other dogs ( his groomer rescues dogs so there are always 10 or 12 dogs around when he goes to stay) so not sure what the problem is.

Any ideas welcome!
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Amanda Elsdon-Dew
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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 8:57 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Gosh I am impressed, especially that Louis is clearly good with strange dogs and people, who I don't think Dinah will ever accept until she has known them for a good time.
Re training, the books all I understand is that you have to build up basic obedience with ever stronger temptations and if it goes haywire just go back to the level where it does work, but I guess you know all that. Certainly the temptation to chase is the biggest one that challenges our dogs.
The brilliant trainer (or so I think) who I take Dinah and Brion to when I can afford it (one at a time) recommends re heel work that the owner has two different sorts of harness/ head collar whatever, because the dog will learn to distinguish between formal heel work, which should be carried out totally consistently, and the dog should be deprived of whatever matters most to it (ie the walk itself in Dinah's case) if it pulls when wearing THAT tackle and being instructed clearly to heel, but there should also be an expediency collar/harness etc for the moments when the owner just doesn't have the time for all the stops, starts, returns to the house if need be, and then the dog can be allowed to pull, just to get to the place.
I haven't really practised this because to be honest my neck and shoulder can't cope with mega pulling so I have persisted with mainly insisting on proper heelwork and just tolerating semi pulling when I must, which may of course explain why Dinah's heelwork is now much improved but not perfect.
I just suggest it in case it might help you.
Amanda

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Fuzydog
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PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2015 7:41 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I am no expert, and you have probably tried what I am going to suggest, but will mention it just in case Embarassed
Have you tried just standing/sitting him when you see another dog coming near.
You need to remain relaxed with no pressure on lead. Ask for his attention, so focus is off the other dog and praise when ever eye contact is with you. I would use food to start with. When you are getting consistent attention you could increase difficulty by walking closer before asking for stationary attention, to a point before the dog shows stress/ pulls. The reward needs to be something they really want.
Final stage dog walks to heel giving full attention, as and when you ask them to, as they anticipate a nice reward.

The picture below shows Azera giving full attention in our garden, but today I took her to an obedience show for a walk around to get use to all the dogs and people. I did not get 100% attention for long periods just enough to get her past dogs she fancied playing with lol . But when I asked she gave me eye contact because she loves her grub... sausages
Image
Cool Embarassed
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Nikki dogwalker
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2015 6:59 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Hi all,

I trained both of my last briards to Gold Good Citizen, using clicker training, but as many of you have said, its about the association so you can use whatever word/sound you like.

Morgan was very quick to learn (very eager to please his mum!) and had more concentration than Magnus, who did get very frustrated if he didn't understand. The thing that I learned from my behaviour post grad which was very useful was that if your dog isn't getting it, there's no point in endlessly repeating the same way of teaching something (can be a fault with some training classes where a particular thing is taught in a particular way). Instead, find a new way of teaching it.

The first time I tried to teach Magnus a send to bed, he ambled up the hall and flopped down like he'd been filleted under the mirror ball in the middle. The whole class laughed, and the attention was more rewarding than any treat - I never managed to do a send to bed again - however, I then taught him to target a ball on a stick and then target and down, and achieved the same result without the frustration.

I did also try a dancing dog day course, with Magnus (didn't have Morgan then), but we (mainly me) were a bit crap.

Not sure that Matisse (now 14 months) would be a natural at agility, but once my life gets back on some sort of an even keel, I definitely have plans to try it with Marlowe (aka Cyprus Shaggy) who I think would be fab - if I can haul my knackered old frame round after him!

Give it a go, and whatever you decide to do, have fun with your pup!
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